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February 13, 2008

Analysis: New direction necessary for Nevada's energy needs

Smokestack There's been some great work identifying Nevada's huge clean energy potential, and a new report out from The Energy Foundation lays out some specific doable projects that can be started now and help the state avoid building any new coal-fired power plants.

The report lists projects related to electricity transmission lines, energy efficiency, renewables and natural gas - all projects that will have Nevada avoiding the "risks associated with large-scale centralized generation," meaning putting all your eggs in the coal basket. The report's author is Dr. Carl Linvill, who once served as Nev. Gov. Kenny Guinn's energy advisor and as a commissioner on the Nevada Public Utilities Commission.

Click here to read the Energy Foundation's press release (which briefly outlines the projects), and click here to read the entire report.

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